Technical Desktops - Accessories


Early Calc and Computers Selection:

1) 5000-5884 Magnetic Card for 9100 (1968)
2) 9101A Memory for 9100 (1970)
3) 9102A Buffer Box (1970)
4) 9162-0012 Magnetic Card for 9810/20 (1971)
5) 11210A Math ROM for 9810 (1971)
6) Calculator Printer Paper (1971)
7) 9162-0050 Tape for 9830 (1972)
8) 9868A I/O Expander (1972)
9) 11202A TTL I/O Interface (1972)
10) 11203A BCD Interface (1972)
11) 11211A Printer ROM 9810 (1972)
12) 11220A Periph Cont I ROM 9820 (1972)
13) 11221A Math ROM for 9820 (1972)
14) 11223A Tape Cass ROM 9820 (1972)
15) 11222A User Def ROM for 9820 (1972)
16) 11252A Periph Cont II ROM 9810 (1972)
17) 11272B Extended I/O ROM 9830 (1972)
18) 11224A Periph Cont II ROM 9820 (1972)
19) 11261A Plot/Print ROM 9810 (1972)
20) 11270B Matrix ROM 9830 (1972)
21) 11271 Plotter ROM 9830 (1972)
22) 11274B String Var ROM 9830 (1972)
23) 11262A Periph/Tape ROM 9810 (1972)
24) 11277A Terminal I ROM 9830 (1972)
25) 11201A Typewriter Interface (1972)
26) 11205A Serial Interface (1973)
27) 11279B Adv Prog ROM 9830 (1973)
28) 11285A Data Comm Int 9830 (1973)
29) 11289B Adv Prog II ROM 9830 (1973)
30) 11336A 9871 Interface for 9830 (1973)
31) 11278B Batch BASIC ROM 9830 (1973)
32) 11282A Incremental Plotter ROM 9830 (1973)
33) 11273B Mass Memory ROM (1973)
34) 11206A Modem Interface (1973)
35) 98XX Coupler to HP Computers (1973)
36) Infotek Systems (1975)
37) 59405A HP-IB Interface 9830 (1975)
38) 11283 - 9871A Printer Control 9830 (1976)

 

HP entered the desktop computer business in 1968 with the introduction of the 9100. The 9100A was designed at HP Labs in California and manufactured in Loveland, Colorado. The 9100 was replaced by the 9810A in 1971. HP had only a single product offering until the 9820A and 9830A were introduced in 1972 to complement the 9810A. The 98XX machines shared many common internal parts. The 9830A came standard with BASIC language built in and is considered by many to be HP's first personal computer. It also included a single-line display, built in mass storage (cassette tape) with an optional thermal printer. The 9100 was an immediate success for HP as were its successors. These products spawned the development of HP's Loveland and Fort Collins Colorado divisions, which gave birth to many innovations in desktop technical computing in the 1970s and 1980s.

These products were developed and manufactured at HP's Loveland Division.

For more information on these products, be sure to sure to visit the Keyboard Magazine library.

The museum has software for these old machines on magnetic cards and magnetic cassette tape. Click here for the software listing.

Be sure to vist Steve Leibson's excellent site for more detailed information on the genesis of the 98X0 computers, www.hp9825.com.

To download an emulator of HP 9800 Series computers (9810, 9820 and 9830), visit Achim Burger's site at: http://sourceforge.net/projects/hp9800e.


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