Printers


LaserJet III

Laser Selection:

Name: LaserJet III
Product Number: 33449A
Introduced: 1990
Division: Boise
Ad: Click to see, Click to see, Click to see, Click to see, Click to see
Original Price: $2395
Catalog Reference: 1991, page 691

Description:

The LaserJet III was another significant breakthrough for HP. It was based on the same 8 ppm Canon SX engine as the LaserJet II. The LaserJet III offered two major improvements. It offered Resolution Enhancement Technology (RET). Although still a 300 dpi printer, RET allowed the laser to adjust the size and position of dots within a dot location in a character cell matrix and on the edges of graphics lines and arcs. This gave the printer an effective resolution of near 600 dots per inch, without requiring more memory or slowing down print speed. RET did not apply to bit-mapped (scanned) images, whose resolution was indistinguishable from the LaserJet II. RET was the last major improvement in text print quality. To the naked eye, today's highest resolution printers do not produce noticably better text qulaity than did the LaserJet III. The other major breakthrough in the LaserJet III was the printer language PCL5. The primary benefit of PCL 5 was that it printed internal scalable fonts (like Postscript), but without the cost and memory overheads. Only two fonts were available - CG Times (Times Roman clone) and Universe (Helvetica clone). PCL5 also included the latest generation graphics language from HP: HP-GL/2

Click here to see the LaserJet III in an article on the Silicon Valley TV program "Computer Chronicles" in 1991. (2 minute 14 seconds, 9.3MB).

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